“It’s in God’s Hands now”

Last night was the final night of preliminary competition.

Graduate student Brittany Thornton competed in swimsuit

Sami McDaniel played a beautiful piece on the piano for her talent

Scarlett Short performed a lyrical dance for her talent

Sue Ann Forrest wore a stunning green evening gown and answered her onstage question about how women need a good role model.

The judges use numbers to say how many points they received for each part of the competition and by tonight, for the final, all the numbers will be added up and the top ten will be revealed.  The top ten then go to compete in evening gown, talent, and swimsuit/fitness again and the judges will score them based only on tonight’s performance.

Last night after the competition was over I heard someone say, “It’s up to the numbers now.” But Sophomore Scarlett Short said “It’s in God’s hands now.”

 

Written By: Hannah Gooding

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“The Best is yet to Come”

Wednesday June 22 was the first night of the preliminary competitions for the girls to compete to see who will be the next Miss North Carolina.  The ladies are divided into three different groups and each group does a different element of the competition each night. on Wednesday, here is what the Campbell students did.

Sue Ann Forrest: Swim Suit/ Fitness

Sami McDaniel: Evening Gown/Onstage Question

Scarlett Short: Evening Gown/Onstage Question

In addition to these three, there is also a Campbell graduate student, Brittany Thorton.

Brittany Thorton: Talent

Sue Ann was one of the fittest in her group while Sami wore a green dress that shone as bright as the Emerald City. Scarlett wore a dress that lived up to her name.  She wore a stunning red dress with red earrings.

“It was a great night.  The best is yet to come.” -Scarlett Short

Written By: Hannah Gooding

ANDREW WITCZAK: ROAD 2 RECOVERY

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On Saturday, April 18, 2015, in a conference game against Charleston Southern, Andrew Witczak gets the start on the mound for the Camels. He cruises through the first inning and goes back out for the second. With no runners on and one out, the second batter of the inning steps in the box. Andrew works the batter to a 1-1 count; steps back on the rubber to get the sign from the catcher for the next pitch. The catcher calls a fastball; Witczak nods his head up and down to confirm the sign. He starts his wind up towards home plate, as he throws the pitch, he felt something completely unorthodox happen in his arm as the balled flopped out of his hand and bounced on the ground. That was it! Little did he know, he would be out for the rest of the season with one of pitchers most feared injuries, Tommy John. Over the next eleven to twelve and a half months, Andrew would be on his “Road 2 Recovery.”

 

By: Erick Gaylord 

 

My Cheer Experience

Cheer leading, typically thought of as a girls sport, or not even a sport at all, but not usually associated with males. This stereotype is very untrue. Cheerleading has tons of males involved in it, especially during the competition aspect of it. Cheer involves lifting people in the air, not throwing a 2lb ball. There are extensive workouts because it involves and requires all of your muscles to be used. A little background on myself, I have never cheered a day in my life until my senior year here at CU. I did pageants, modeled, sang, and played soccer and basketball as a young child. In high school I was competitive dancer for all four years. Again, the stereotypes of dance are untrue; it requires for a person to be conditioned and physically active. I came back to Campbell this year wanting to find a way to get active and get back in shape. Cheer I thought was a good option. Little did I know how much physical activity it entailed, I love cheering. Collegiate cheering is much different from high school and competition cheer. From the way we stunt, to the way we tumble, and also to the rules that we have to follow. One thing that differs us from competition cheer is the fact that we only get one chance to prove ourselves in the cheer world. One competition to show off all of our skills that we have worked so diligently on during the year. From my perspective I look at the football and basketball games as simple practices and ways to keep ourselves involved. Cheer is honestly based off of muscle memory, hitting the same stunt 40 times in a row, and then doing it after a month without practice and hitting it comes from muscle memory. If we are being completely honest here, my favorite part of cheering is the chants and showing spirit at the games, it’s the stunting and building relationships with people that I otherwise would not even speak to if it wasn’t for cheer. The feeling of putting on that uniform on game day is so different. Even if some may argue that statement, putting on that uniform knowing you’re a representation of your university, makes you want to go out and hit all of your stunts, and land all of your tumbling. Cheering for me isn’t just about the scholarship, or working out, or even putting the hard work in, it is honestly all about the friendships, and  being a part of something bigger. Walking around campus and people recognizing me because I stand on the field or on the court with a uniform boosts my self-esteem. Cheering during a game is so much fun because you are the one who starts the chanting, you are the one who tries to get the crowd pumped for the game. Win or lose a game, WE ARE CU! GO CAMELS!

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Written By: Austin Ivory Phelps

Room of the Week

This weeks Room belongs to Maggie Baker who lives in a house very close to campus.

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Maggie Baker’s room is very welcoming and homey.  Growing up around the water, she found restfulness in it, and she wanted to bring that to her room.  Thus, it is decorated in a yellow and red nautical theme to remind her of the rest she finds when she’s around the water.  The decorations are not loud and bright, but rather warm, subtle, and calming.  Her room is very much a place where she can go and feel safe.

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Photos and article by: Taylor Young

Party in the Park Video

Did you come out to the Party in the Park on Friday August 21, 2015? Check out this video and see if you can spot yourself!  If you missed the event, watch the recap to see what went down.

Video By: Hannah Gooding

Q&A with Campbell Faces

Originally from Ramseur, North Carolina, Tiffany Seawell came to Campbell not only to work hard, but to lead in Healthcare Management and Business.

“The first time I stepped foot onto Campbell’s campus, I locked in my decision. I love the atmosphere and I love the people,” Seawell said. “I have great relationships with not only my peers but also my professors and even the Dean of Lundy-Fetterman School of Business.”

Seawell has led the charge on campus in healthcare management, overseeing a panel discussion on healthcare expansion in North Carolina, as President of the Healthcare Management Club.

“We planned and worked up until the day of the panel discussion. We all worked tirelessly last semester, and I’m so proud to say that the panel discussion was a success.” Seawell said. “I definitely did not do it alone, I had a great team.”

In addition to hosting the outstanding panel discussion, Seawell has been a dynamic student leader in her field through her experiences interning.

“I have had two internships where I worked with the Administrator of a nursing home and the Administrator of an assisted living for the mentally ill. These internships were probably the most important thing I have done to better my education.” Seawell said. “After gaining experience, concepts in the classroom became real and I was able to connect to lessons more by being able to apply them to what I have experienced.”

Seawell attributes much of her success to the opportunities she was afforded as a student at Campbell.

“When I met Dean Hawkins on a visitation day, and he knew my name, I knew that this was my school.” Seawell said. “He promised me great opportunities and a great education, which I have gotten ten-fold.”

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Written By: Louis Duke